Building Waterproof Drones: The Journey to Finding the Perfect Print Solution

Since the crew at [CPSdrone] has a passion for creating underwater drones, they encountered a crucial challenge – how to 3D print waterproof hulls. Initially, they believed that there were multiple reasons for water entering the hulls. Nevertheless, they soon discovered that the main culprit was the water seeping through the print surface, which was expected due to the tiny pores typically found on the surface of FDM printers.

To combat this issue, the team experimented with epoxy, a common sealant. While it provided some success, further tests were required to find a foolproof solution. To achieve this, they created a sample submersible hull for users to conduct their own trials. After a series of tests under varying water pressure, they realized that as the pressure increased, more water infiltrated the plastic layers.

With this knowledge, the team delved into exploring the capabilities of dichtol, a potent chemical known for its waterproofing properties. By soaking the prints in dichtol, they noticed a substantial reduction in water ingress, even at high pressures. The chemical effectively penetrated the plastic layers, leaving behind a resin-like substance after evaporation.

Taking it a step further, the crew also experimented with resin printing. Although the results were initially skewed due to the presence of excess resin, they persevered and had engineering plastic models made for an accurate rerun of the experiment.

These findings hold significant importance for those seeking to create underwater devices. While [CPSdrone] is not the sole player in the underwater drone field, their dedication to finding the ideal printing solution showcases their commitment to innovation and the advancement of this technology.

Source: [CPSdrone] YouTube Channel (link to video embedded in the original article)

FAQs:

1. What challenge did the crew at CPSdrone face in creating underwater drones?
The crew at CPSdrone faced the challenge of 3D printing waterproof hulls for their underwater drones.

2. What was the main reason for water entering the hulls?
The main reason for water entering the hulls was water seeping through the print surface due to the tiny pores found on the surface of FDM printers.

3. What did the team experiment with to combat the issue?
The team experimented with epoxy, a common sealant, to combat the issue.

4. Did the use of epoxy provide a foolproof solution?
While epoxy provided some success, further tests were required to find a foolproof solution.

5. What chemical did the team use to achieve a reduction in water ingress?
The team used dichtol, a potent chemical known for its waterproofing properties, to achieve a reduction in water ingress.

6. How did dichtol work to reduce water ingress?
By soaking the prints in dichtol, the chemical effectively penetrated the plastic layers, leaving behind a resin-like substance after evaporation, which reduced water ingress.

7. Did the crew also experiment with resin printing?
Yes, the crew also experimented with resin printing.

8. What were the results of the resin printing experiment?
Initially, the results were skewed due to the presence of excess resin, but the crew persevered and had engineering plastic models made for an accurate rerun of the experiment.

9. Why are these findings significant?
These findings are significant for those seeking to create underwater devices, as they provide insights into the ideal printing solutions for waterproof hulls.

Definitions:
– Underwater drones: Drones specifically designed to operate underwater.
– 3D printing: The process of creating three-dimensional objects by depositing layers of material based on a digital model.
– Waterproof: Resistant to the penetration of water.
– Hulls: Protective outer coverings or structures of objects, in this case, referring to the outer coverings of the underwater drones.
– Seep: To pass, flow, or ooze gradually through a porous substance or small opening.
– Epoxy: A type of resin often used as an adhesive or sealant.
– Foolproof: Highly reliable and unlikely to fail or go wrong.
– Ingress: The act of going or coming in, in this case, referring to water entering the hulls.
– Dichtol: A potent chemical known for its waterproofing properties.
– Resin printing: A 3D printing method that uses liquid resin and ultraviolet (UV) light to create solid objects.
– Skewed: Distorted or biased in a particular direction or unfairly represented.

Suggested related link:
CPSdrone